TGL font

By Peter Wiegel on Aug 02, 2018

TGL

TGL

TGL

TGL

Google Translate says:

Once in the "early days" on technical drawings, an ornate cursive prevailed (I did this as a "Amptmann Script" in the program) fit this after the first world war not to the much more modern technology and the significant degree linigeren sense of style. How fonts for lettering technical drawings under the DIN 16 and DIN 17 was shortly after the first DIN standard sheet "taper pins to DIN 1" very soon standardized. The basis for these fonts the font recommendation of the Prussian railway administration after patterning IV 44 as DIN 1451 found its way into the DIN standards a little later. Thus, these writings also the same ratio of line width to the height of the capital letters, but with regard to the pen with the nib ends. The writing has - almost unchanged until the late 1960s and was led in the West under the DIN designation continues - with some minor revisions. In the GDR, the standard sheet was also unchanged in the "Technical quality and delivery" briefly taken over by TGL and think of "0 -" indicated that it is actually an old DIN standard. In the early 1970s, then more and more technical drawings were microfilmed. It was found that the bold font with a line width of 1/7 of the cap height tends to tapering and thus unreadable. Also used to label other technical pens were required than for drawing. Thus, as a transitional step, the line width decreases to 1/10 of the cap height, the number of font sizes reduced and so made ​​the crayons also be used for labeling. A short time later, the script was by then the better microfilm suitable for DIN EN ISO 3098th replaced, which was standardized in the GDR in the TGL 31034th Here I offer the original bold version.
AAAaaa
<style type="text/css">
@font-face{
    font-family:"tgl-0-16-regular";
    src:url("https://fontsme.com/wp-data/t/971/971/file/tgl.0-16.ttf") format("woff"),
    url("https://fontsme.com/wp-data/t/971/971/file/tgl.0-16.ttf") format("opentype"),
    url("https://fontsme.com/wp-data/t/971/971/file/tgl.0-16.ttf") format("truetype");
}
span.font0{font-family:"tgl-0-16-regular";font-size:px;text-transform:;}
</style>
TGL 0-16 Regular
<style type="text/css">
@font-face{
    font-family:"tgl-0-17-regular";
    src:url("https://fontsme.com/wp-data/t/971/971/file/tgl.0-17.ttf") format("woff"),
    url("https://fontsme.com/wp-data/t/971/971/file/tgl.0-17.ttf") format("opentype"),
    url("https://fontsme.com/wp-data/t/971/971/file/tgl.0-17.ttf") format("truetype");
}
span.font1{font-family:"tgl-0-17-regular";font-size:px;text-transform:;}
</style>
TGL 0-17 Regular
<style type="text/css">
@font-face{
    font-family:"tgl-0-17-alt-regular";
    src:url("https://fontsme.com/wp-data/t/971/971/file/tgl.0-17-alt.ttf") format("woff"),
    url("https://fontsme.com/wp-data/t/971/971/file/tgl.0-17-alt.ttf") format("opentype"),
    url("https://fontsme.com/wp-data/t/971/971/file/tgl.0-17-alt.ttf") format("truetype");
}
span.font2{font-family:"tgl-0-17-alt-regular";font-size:px;text-transform:;}
</style>
TGL 0-17 Alt Regular
<style type="text/css">
@font-face{
    font-family:"tgl-31034-1-regular";
    src:url("https://fontsme.com/wp-data/t/971/971/file/tgl.31034-1-normal.ttf") format("woff"),
    url("https://fontsme.com/wp-data/t/971/971/file/tgl.31034-1-normal.ttf") format("opentype"),
    url("https://fontsme.com/wp-data/t/971/971/file/tgl.31034-1-normal.ttf") format("truetype");
}
span.font3{font-family:"tgl-31034-1-regular";font-size:px;text-transform:;}
</style>
TGL 31034-1 Regular
<style type="text/css">
@font-face{
    font-family:"tgl-31034-2-regular";
    src:url("https://fontsme.com/wp-data/t/971/971/file/tgl.31034-2.ttf") format("woff"),
    url("https://fontsme.com/wp-data/t/971/971/file/tgl.31034-2.ttf") format("opentype"),
    url("https://fontsme.com/wp-data/t/971/971/file/tgl.31034-2.ttf") format("truetype");
}
span.font4{font-family:"tgl-31034-2-regular";font-size:px;text-transform:;}
</style>
TGL 31034-2 Regular

Ad1

ad2